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Posts for category: Foot Condition

By South Jersey Foot and Ankle Specialists, LLC
January 03, 2022
Category: Foot Condition
Tags: Arthritis  
Arthritis and Your FeetIs the pain and stiffness you’re experiencing in your feet and ankles caused by arthritis? If arthritis is left untreated, it’s possible that your symptoms could become so severe that they could affect your quality of life. Therefore, your podiatrist may recommend seeking medical attention right away to reduce the amount of damage to the joints.

What are the signs and symptoms of arthritic feet?

Wondering if you could be dealing with arthritis in your feet? Some warning signs include,
  • Joint pain and stiffness
  • Joint swelling
  • Joint warmth and tenderness to the touch
  • Pain with movement
  • Increased pain and swelling after rest
How do podiatrists treat arthritis of the feet?

There are several different treatment options that we have available to handle your arthritis symptoms:

Medication: Over-the-counter anti-inflammatories like ibuprofen can help reduce inflammation and pain. While those with more minor bouts of arthritis can often find relief from these medications, some patients may need a prescription-strength pain reliever to manage more severe symptoms.
Steroid injections: A dose of corticosteroids administered directly into the joint can help greatly reduce pain and inflammation. While this can be an effective treatment option, the effects are only temporary.
Physical Therapy: There are some exercises you can perform to help increase flexibility and movement while also strengthening your foot and ankle muscles to prevent further problems. Talk to your foot doctor about the different exercises you can perform each day to help improve your foot health and reduce arthritis symptoms.
Lifestyle changes: You should minimize certain activities that could cause symptoms to worsen. This includes switching from more high-impact exercises such as running to lower-impact exercises such as swimming, which will take some of the stress and pressure off the feet and ankles. If necessary we may also advise you to lose weight, as well.
Customized orthotics: Wearing orthotics made specifically for your feet can help take pressure off certain areas of the feet and help reduce pain while moving. Talk to your podiatrist about custom-made orthotics and whether they could improve your condition.

If these conservative treatments don’t do much to help your condition, then we may need to discuss the possibility of surgery. There are different kinds of surgery that we can perform and a lot will depend on the severity and cause of your arthritis. Those with advanced forms of arthritis may have to consider a total ankle replacement.
By South Jersey Foot and Ankle Specialists, LLC
October 25, 2021
Category: Foot Condition
Tags: Bone Spurs  
Bone SpursBone spurs may develop on your foot over time and cause severe pain. Recovering from this health issue requires a careful approach and a myriad of different treatments. Understanding each of these options will help to make your recovery smoother and minimize your suffering as an individual. Here's what you need to know about this topic, including both non-surgical and surgical care options for your spurs.

Non-Surgical Care for Bone Spurs 

Most podiatrists attempt non-surgical care before turning to any operating on a bone spur. These simple steps help to minimize pain and relieve suffering. Typically, they'll start by suggesting over-the-counter pain medication or prescribing high-dose medicines of this type. Acetaminophen, ibuprofen, and naproxen sodium can all help to cut back on this kind of bone spur pain. 

However, they may also suggest icing the area, prescribe regular massage visits, or even provide specialized shoes or footwear that support the bone spur and minimize your pain. The extra padding helps to keep the spur from rubbing up against the shoe and worsening. Sometimes, they may also prescribe a weight-loss routine, including a specialized diet and controlled exercise routines to help decrease foot pressure. 

Most of the time, these treatments help to minimize pain and keeps you on your feet. Typically, they rarely cause any serious complications and can be worked around in your day-to-day life. But, unfortunately, there are instances in which a bone spur could be more than a minor nuisance. In these situations, surgery is necessary to ensure that you recover fully from this problem.

Surgical Options 

Does your bone spur press on your nerves and limit your range of motion? If so, you're not alone. Many people experience this kind of struggle and need surgery to recovery. Surgeons start by checking the extent of your bone spur and seeing how it impacts your foot and leg and your mobility.

Then, they'll carefully come up with a surgical plan that removes the spur and keeps your body safe. This procedure requires carefully opening up the skin around the spur and surgically cutting it away from the foot. A short recovery period will follow, one that helps to ensure your foot fully recovers before you put excess weight on it.

Find Help Today 

If you think you have a bone spur and want to get help, reach out to a local podiatrist today to learn more. They'll work with you to find a treatment plan that makes sense. Catching it early enough should minimize your need for surgery. With this type of help, you can regain a pain-free life and transition back to the everyday experiences that your bone spur has robbed from you. 
By South Jersey Foot and Ankle Specialists, LLC
August 31, 2021
Category: Foot Condition
Tags: Cavus Foot  
High Arches in ChildrenWhen babies are born they are born with flat feet. Typically the arches of the feet don’t develop until children are 3-4 years old; however, sometimes the arches of the feet develop higher than they should, which can cause the feet to flex. This is known as cavus foot and this problem typically occurs within the first 10 years of a child’s life. Since this condition can impact mobility you must see a podiatrist if this is something you think your child might be dealing with.

The Problem with Cavus Foot

Cavus foot needs to be addressed right away by a podiatrist, as this condition can lead to a variety of issues for your child. Cavus foot is more likely to lead to imbalances within the feet, which in turn can also impact the function of the ankle, legs, hips, and even lower back. Children and teens with cavus foot may be more likely to deal with aches, pains, and strains within the feet, ankles, legs, and hips. This condition can also lead to metatarsalgia, Achilles tendonitis, and chronic ankle sprains.

Causes of Cavus Foot

In many cases, a muscle or nerve disorder that impacts how the muscles function causes cavus foot. This leads to imbalances that cause the distinctive high arches of this condition. Of course, other conditions such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, muscular dystrophy, and spina bifida can also increase the chances of developing cavus foot.

Treating Cavus Foot

You must be watching your little ones as they start to walk to see if you notice any differences in how they move. Catching these issues early offers your child the best chance at improved mobility and less risk for developing foot problems later on. Your podiatrist may work together with a neurologist to pinpoint whether a nerve disorder could be the underlying cause.

Once your foot specialist determines the root cause of your child’s cavus foot then they can map out a customized treatment plan. Milder cases may benefit from more conservative treatment options such as custom orthotics and arch supports; however, surgery is often necessary to correct this problem.

Any issues with mobility, particularly in children, should be addressed and assessed as quickly as possible. Turn to a podiatrist that also specializes in providing pediatric podiatry to children and teens, as they will be able to provide the most thorough treatment plan for your little one.
By South Jersey Foot and Ankle Specialists, LLC
August 25, 2021
Category: Foot Condition
Tags: Morton’s Neuroma  

Does standing or walking send jolts of pain through your foot? You may have Morton's neuroma, one of the foot and ankle conditions treated by your foot doctor in Vineland, NJ, Dr. Jeffrey Belancio of South Jersey Foot and Ankle Specialists.

What is Morton's neuroma?

Morton's neuroma occurs when the tissue that surrounds a nerve in your toes thickens and becomes inflamed. The condition usually develops between the third and fourth toes.

What are the symptoms of Morton's neuroma?

If you have Morton's neuroma, you may experience:

  • Foot Pain: Burning pain may travel from your toes to the ball of your foot.
  • Numbness: Numbness or tingling in the front part of your foot can occur if you've been standing or walking for a long time.
  • Swelling: The area between your toes may become noticeably swollen.
  • Foreign Body Sensation: It may feel as if you have a pebble stuck in your shoe, even though there's nothing there.

You may be more likely to get Morton's neuroma if:

  • You wear high heels, tight shoes, or any shoes that increase pressure on the fronts of your feet.
  • You have a foot condition, such as flat feet, bunions, hammertoes, or a foot deformity.
  • You run or play tennis.
  • You injured your foot.

How is Morton's neuroma treated?

Shoe changes may help reduce your pain. Swap your high heels or tight shoes for lower-heeled shoes that cushion your foot and offer plenty of room in the toe area. Choose shoes with a 2' heel or lower. The higher the heel, the more pressure on the front of your foot.

If changing the type of shoes you wear doesn't relieve your symptoms, make an appointment with your foot doctor at the Vineland, NJ, podiatry office. Depending on the severity of your symptoms, he may recommend anti-inflammatory medication, corticosteroid injections, or orthotics.

Prescription orthotics are custom-designed for your foot. They offer plenty of cushioning, keep your feet properly aligned in your shoes, and reduce pressure on your feet when you stand and walk.

Most people don't need surgery, but the removal of the nerve may be the best option if your symptoms don't improve after trying conservative treatments.

Don't let foot pain keep you from enjoying life! Call your Vineland, NJ, foot doctor, Dr. Belancio of South Jersey Foot and Ankle Specialists at (856) 839-0579 to schedule an appointment.

By South Jersey Foot and Ankle Specialists, LLC
July 21, 2021
Category: Foot Condition
Tags: Ingrown Toenail   Podiatrist  
Ingrown NailWhile minor aches and pains in your feet probably won’t have you rushing to the podiatrist’s office for care, certain seemingly innocuous foot problems might require a professional’s touch. Take ingrown toenails, for example. While you may be able to soothe and ease the pain on your own, it’s also important to recognize when an ingrown toenail may require treatment from a podiatrist.

What is an ingrown toenail?

An ingrown toenail occurs when the edge of the nail grows into the skin, causing redness, swelling, and pain. While this can happen to any toenail, it more commonly affects the big toe. While a minor ingrown toenail for an otherwise healthy individual may not be a cause for concern, some situations warrant turning to a podiatrist for care.

When should I see a podiatrist?

If you notice any of these signs of an infected ingrown toenail it’s time to visit a foot doctor:
  • Increased pain, swelling, or redness
  • Skin that’s hard to the touch
  • Odor
  • Pus or drainage coming from the nail
If the ingrown toenail hasn’t gotten better in a couple of days this also warrants seeing a podiatrist. People with compromised immune systems, diabetes, or nerve damage in their feet should come in right away for care (and should not try to simply treat the problem themselves). Ignoring these issues when they occur could lead to more dangerous infections or complications.

Can you prevent ingrown toenails?

There are things you can do to reduce your risk of developing an ingrown toenail. Some of these steps include:
  • Not picking, pulling, or tearing your toenails (especially torn edges)
  • Making sure that you are trimming your nails straight across (never curved) and that you keep them level with the tips of your toes
  • Wearing shoes that have a large toe box and don’t bunch up your toes (shoes with a pointed toe will put too much pressure on the toenails)
  • Wearing the appropriate footwear for certain activities, such as construction work or sports, to prevent injuries
If you are experiencing symptoms of an infected ingrown toenail, or if you have never dealt with an ingrown toenail before, turn to your podiatrist for a proper evaluation and treatment plan. No problem is too small for a foot and ankle specialist to tackle.


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